Saturday , 25 March 2017

Kitchen Design Tips – Part 2

Part 1 of the kitchen design series looked at how to develop the brief for your kitchen design, including the type of questions you need to be asking the client. We also looked at different layouts, along with the work triangle.

If you missed part 1 click on the button below:

 

In Part 2 we will look at standard kitchen sizes, along with some really useful and important rules of thumb that will help you design a practical and functional kitchen.

Standard kitchen sizes

Kitchens units, appliances and worktops come in standard sizes. These sizes allow for consistency throughout the industry and are a very economical options compared to the requirement of bespoke units at random measurements.

The following table shows coordinated dimensions for kitchen units. The height of worktops should be adapted to suit the height of the user and can vary between 850mm – 950mm – generally speaking 900mm is most common.

Standard kitchen sizes - First In Architecture
 
Standard kitchen sizes - First In Architecture Standard kitchen sizes - First In Architecture Standard kitchen sizes - First In Architecture

Kitchen Design Rules of thumb

There are some fundamental design principles when it comes to planning your kitchen that should be considered. These rules of thumb should help you avoid potential awkward spaces, and poor functionality.

Rule 1 – Kitchen door clearance

Ensure there is at least 400mm clearance between a kitchen door and the nearest units. This essentially means allowing for 1200mm between the units and the wall with the door.
 Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

If you are planning a narrow galley style kitchen, and the room is less than 1800mm wide, you cannot comfortably use a standard 600mm deep unit. You may need to use bespoke (however this would affect appliances) – or reconsider your design.

Rule 2 – Distance between units

Allow a minimum 1200mm clearance between runs of units. Most doors open up to around 600mm, i.e. dishwasher, oven door, unit door so a minimum of 1200mm will allow people to pass when then doors are open.

A distance of 1500mm between units will allow two people to pass with ease when the doors are closed.

Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 3 – Work triangle

Try to keep the work triangle to a distance of 7 metres or less, this allows for a comfortable working distance.
Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 4 – Clearance between worktop and wall mounted cabinet

Allow for at least 400mm clearance between the worktop and wall mounted cupboard, to ensure there is sufficient working space below the cupboard on the worktop.
Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 5 – Door Interference

Ensure no entry doors or appliance doors interfere with one another.
Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 6 – Distance behind seating

Ensure you provide enough space behind a seated diner to allow traffic to pass.

The minimum clearance from the table or counter to any wall or other obstruction behind the seating area is 800mm.

If someone is to walk past, a distance of 1100mm should be provided. For a wheelchair to comfortably move past the seated diner a distance of 1500mm should be provided.

Rule 7 – Food preparation and work area

Allow a minimum of 800mm width worktop next to a sink for food preparation and work area.

Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 8 – Cooking surface

Allow a minimum of 300mm either side of the hob to ensure suitable work space either side of the cooking area. Also ensure that there is a non combustable surface above the hob and a clearance of at least 600mm.

Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 9 – Traffic

Your kitchen should not be a main thoroughfare to the rest of the house. Make sure traffic does not cross the kitchen work triangle.

Rule 10 – Don’t break up the workspace

Aim to keep things flowing, don’t place a full height cabinet or appliance between any two of the major work centres.

Rule 11 – Place the sink in the centre

The sink should ideally be positioned in the centre of the work triangle as it is the most used area of the kitchen.

Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 12 – Dishwashers

When positioning your dishwasher, ensure it is at least 500mm from a corner, to allow loading from both sides. Also ensure there is standing space in front of the dishwasher for unloading.
Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 13 – Oven set down space

A minimum of 400mm is required beside an oven to be used as a set down space. The same goes for a microwave.
Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 14 – Fridge set down space

Ideally a minimum of 400mm worktop space should be allowed for on the door opening side of the fridge for setting down items.
Kitchen Design Rules of Thumb - First In Architecture

Rule 15 – Fire

Don’t forget the fire regulations, and the necessary provision of smoke detectors, and extinguishers according to the regulations.

Rule 16 – Regulations

Be sure to check the building regulations and standards to ensure your kitchen design complies.

You can download all of the drawings in this post as cad dwgs, by clicking on the button below.

Click here to download the drawings

In Part 3 of the Kitchen Design series we will look at designing for accessibility. This will include loads of helpful tips and ideas to make your kitchen design wheelchair user friendly, work better for people with disabilities or the elderly. Check back soon – this one is going to be really helpful.

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One comment

  1. Fantastic set of tips and advice for kitchen design!

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